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How to Build a Duckboat (Pub. No. 7849)

by Edson I. Schock

Sharp all over, including both ends, is this he-man’s rugged duckboat. She is designed for building by the man who is interested more in hunting than in boatbuilding and hence is simplicity itself, using standard woods

Assuming that the owner of this craft will be more interested in duck shooting than in boatbuilding, she has been designed to be as simple as possible to build, yet to produce a boat that will have good stability and will row reasonably well.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Serviceable Small Boat, A (Pub. No. 7856)

by E.G. Monk

All large boats need tenders and the punt described can be easily and quickly built at low cost.

This 9 foot 9 inch by 3 foot 9 inch punt was built last spring for use as a dingy for a cruiser, and it has proven very satisfactory and serviceable. It is about the cheapest and simplest boat that can be built, the total cost of lumber, paint, and all other materials being very low. It took but a day and a half to build and was all done with hand tools. Short cheap pieces of lumber can be used for the bottom, seats, and ribs, which is a feature that keeps its cost down. The boat is very easy to row and tow and is a good boat to beach on account of the shape of the forward end. It will carry four or five passengers nicely and although light will stand plenty of hard usage.

2 page(s)

$3.50
King Canvasback--A 15 ft. Plywood Kayak (Pub. No. 7861)

by John M. Miller Jr.

Here’s a classic kayak easily built in plywood and~canvas.

Fifteen ft. long and 31 in. in beam, King Canvasback is an ideal fatherand-son project. The craft is easily handled by one man and two boats can be car-topped on a small foreign car. It takes only a few weekends of work from layouT to launching. The project is simple enough for hand tools. but a variable-speed jig saw, drill and orbital sander make the job go faster.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Guenther Garvey, The (Pub. No. 7878)

by J.R. Nowling

Old-timers along New Jersey's south shore are likely to tell you the little outboard garveys that prowl their shallow waters in all seasons of the year were named for a Frenchman called Gervais--but the younger genereration insists that Bob Guenther, a young masonry contractor at Beach Haven, rates most of the credit for the garveys popularity. Actually, the garveyis styled somewhat along the lines of the Barnegat sneakbox, favored by clammers and duck hunters for generations. Probably the most significant difference is underwater: the sneakbox has a rounded bottom, the garvey is flat side to side while curving very gently front to back.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Duck Boat You can Build, A (Pub. No. 7881)

by Jack Seville

In the dark, you paddle quietly. A hint of the sun’s rising shows on the horizon and water laps the side of your boat. Before you sits your Labrador, his ears alert. Between you and him lies a pile of decoys. You are on your way to one of life’s real pleasures . . . a morning of duck shooting. You set out the decoys and hide the boat amongst some reeds, camouflaging it. Then you arrange your shooting gear and hunker down below the gunwale with the Lab to wait for the arrival of the ducks. Every part of this experience is exhilarating. But perhaps most filled with anticipation of all the day’s events is the trip out in the duck boat. The truth is, however, that few duck hunters have a duck boat. Most think one too expensive to own or too heavy to carry or too complicated to build or . . . too something. Too many duck hunters settle for the best they can do from the near shore and never try to get out where the water is and the hunting’s at its best. Which is where this boat comes in. It's a design that solves the problems a duck hunter sometimes has with his duck boat. Copied from craft used by veteran hunters on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, the boat has several things that recommend it. First, AquaDuck it can be built inexpensively. Secondly, the boat isn’t awkward. Designed to hold one man plus one dog plus gear, she can be moved about by one man and carried on the top of a car. And thirdly, the boat makes an easy project to put together. Essentially an oblong box with a rocker bottom, construction materials are mostly two sheets of 1/4-in. plywood and a quantity of 1-in, lumber. The hull is compartmentalized into three watertight chambers, and there’s not a difficult curve in the craft. As a boat, she demonstrates a nice design. She can be rowed or poled with an oar, or powered by a 2- or 3-hp outboard, or towed to her station by another boat. The wide stance and flat bottom give her good stability—you can stand up on one of the side decks or the forward deck and not tip over. Yet she ranks high in maneuverability. And as a duck blind, the boat offers some thoughtful features. One of these is the grass rail that surrounds the cockpit and provides a place to stuff grass and reeds to make good camouflage. Ahd another is the cockpit itself, which is shallow but with a coaming all around. In use, you lie in the cockpit with feet at the transom and gun pointed aft. The coaming slants down toward the stern to give an unobstructed view.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Nor'Wester--A 15.5-Ft. Alaskan Type Kayak (Pub. No. 7882)

by Hi Sibley
Anyone handy with ordinary carpenter tools should be able to buld this light and sturdy Alaskan Eskimo-type kayak. The ornamental piece at the stem represents the head of a seal and serves a practical purpose as a handle for carrying to and from the beach, and the stern assembly also has a handle.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Basement Boat (Pub. No. 7885)

by Bob Whittier

Many boats have been build in basements. Its one of the things folks like to do over a winter. When spring comes, the boat is ready to use. Only problem is, some of those basement-built boats have remained right where they were built—or had to be carefully taken apart—because the builders couldn’t get them out of the basement. This Basement Boat has two great things going for it. And the greatest of these is that you should be able to get it out of the basement when you get it built. It’s designed to be taken out through a cramped space. But better, you can tell how to find out before it’s built whether you might have trouble with it. The second great thing about Basement Boat is that it’s a useful and efficient design. Jillions of 8-ft. prams have been banged out using standard plywood panels. The length of the plywood establishes the size. But when three persons get aboard one of these oversize bathtubs, the poor soul at the oars finds himself hemmed in like a shopper in the Christmas rush. Thus, making our Basement Boat just 2 ft. longer gives each passenger an extra foot of space. And it adds to the hull’s volume, making the boat appreciably more buoyant and safe. And a bonus! The 10-ft. hull fits nicely under one of the 35- to 45sq.-ft. lateen sails that come with sailing surfboards. Thus, no problem finding a sail. The beam of Basement Boat is on the moderate side. This enables her to slip out through basement bulkheads. It also enables her to fit between the fender wells of pickups, station wagons and vans.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Build this Underwater Aquaplane (Pub. No. 7886)

by Walter Morris

Taking a ride on this sleek little underwater sled is a lot like water skiing, but with more thrills. The photos below, taken at Silver Springs, Florida, show how it operatres. By moving the control surfaces you can throw it into a sharp bank, do a slow roll or even flip over and run upside down. As for diving gear, you can get by with simply a mask, snorkel and fins. Construction is simplicity itself. The use of wingnuts with carriage bolts makes it possible to take the quaplane apart for easy carrying.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Convert Your Canoe to Sail (Pub. No. 7888)

by Clint McGirr

Few craft are simpler to rig or more adaptable to sailing than a canoe. They are also excellent for learning to sail. And fortunately, a canoe sailing rig is cheaply made. The, rig is easily assembled to the canoe and easily disassembled for storage or paddling. The only part permanently attached to the canoe is the mast step, a block of wood with a hole drilled in it to hold the mast butt. It is epoxied to the bottom of the canoe and in no way interferes with normal paddling. If your canoe has a beam of at least 30 in., you can convert it for safe sailing. Just keep the sail small so it doesn’t overpower the canoe. Compute a safe sail size by multiplying the canoe’s length by its width. This will give the approximate sail area. The rig here was designed for a canoe 16 ft. long and 2½ ft. wide. It contains 40 sq. ft. of sailcloth and is equilateral, each side measuring 9½ ft. It is a lateen rig.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Build this Pontoon Boat (Pub. No. 7894)

by Harry Wicks

For all-out water fun, safety and economical operation, a pontoon boat is a hard craft to beat. The version shown in this plan sheet is intended for protected waters, and although substantially built, the lightweight materials it is constructedof provide great load-carrying ability without excessive weight.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Build the Quacker (Pub. No. 7895)

by Hal Kelly

A Nimble Lightweight Skimmer for Duck Hunters

Duck hunters have long sought a duckboat of a particular kind—one that can be used in shallow, shallow water. The problem is severe in tidal flats. Man and partner (400 lbs.), man’s best friend (80 lbs.) and gear (25 lbs.) go out to a blind at high tide when there’s 4 ft. of water. Then they want to come home, but the tide’s low and there’s only 4 in. of water. Solution: The Quacker, the shallowest-draft duckboat ever. And it’s pushed by an air motor. With a 67-in, beam, 12-ft. 4-in. length, 16-in, transom height and 3-in. draft, the craft won’t easily tip. It has a storage box (lined if you want) for guns and ammunition, and another for decoys and downed birds. The electric start, 12-hp. Susquehanna air motor pushes the craft to 12 mph, and if you fasten 1-in, angle irons to the outer bottom battens, The Quacker becomes a great ice or snow boat. On ice it should hit 30 mph, so attach a levertype ice brake so you can stop it.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Build this Floating Lawn Chair (Pub. No. 7899)

Mount a patio chair between pontoons and you have the perfect rig for escaping from the heat. For even more fun, hang a fishing motor on it.

If you're looking for hustle or hurry, forget it. This low-power lounge is strictly for loafing. Basically, it’s just a folding aluminum chaise bolted between two pontoons. A stubby 2x8 transom board behind the chair back will take any of the smaller fishing motors, giving you power to putt-putt around the shallows. A steel bracket installed on the motor in place of the steering handle provides for both steering and throttle control through levers mounted on either side of the chair. However, the motor is really just an optional bit of luxury. You’ll have almost as much fun simply floating around near the dock or paddling lazily along the nearby shore. The powered version can be built in a couple of weekends. Forget about power and you’ll not only cut the cost but be able to do the whole job in a day or so. The pontoons are made of Styrofoam sandwiched between 1/2-in, marine plywood. To dress up the appearance, the exposed foam edges are covered with vinyl decking secured with epoxy.

3 page(s)

$3.50
Build this Simplified Canvas Kayak (Pub. No. 7918)

by Hi Sibley

To attain maximum speed with minimum effort, most kayaks are built very long and extremely narrow, so that the lines actually resemble a toothpick. The narrow ones, however, are not easy for the amateur to handle. The one to be described is a much more stable type, having several inches more beam and not so much length. The weight and actual displacement compares favorably with the faster craft. Throughout, this kayak is also designed for simplicity of construction, being identical at both ends, and the roomy cockpit exactly in the middle. Thus frames can be made in pairs, and are spaced the same distances apart. Stem and stern are exactly alike; this enables the passenger to paddle in either direction. In narrow waters, or when one is in a hurry, it is not necessary to swing the craft around—not an easy task in limited space—instead, the passenger simply changes his position from one end of the cockpit to the other. This kayak incidentally, will carry two comfortably.

4 page(s)

$3.50
Build a Jiffy Skiff (Pub. No. 7921)

Great for the kids in the swimming pool.

The principal defect of back-yard built boats is that they leak, and the skipper frequently comes home with wet feet. But here is a craft just as dry as the living room floor, and it is easy to make. Ordinary pine lumber is used. The bottom consists of two nine-inch boards with a chine piece all the way around except at the bow, where the stem is to fit. With the aid of a plane and plenty of sandpaper, the chine and bottom boards are fitted perfectly flush. Binding tape augmented by a liberal amount of marine glue used over all joints will keep Junior’s, shoes from becoming even damp.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Pram with Wheels, A (Pub. No. 7924)

by Bob Whittier

Putting wheels on a pram won’t help it traverse the water. But it can help a lot in getting the pram to the water. And when you put a pair of handles on the other end you can trundle the little vessel right down to the water’s edge like a wheelbarrow.

1 page(s)

$3.50
Travelpod (Pub. No. 7943)

by Charles R. Gretz

It's a Car-Top Boat, Carrier and Camper in One


4 page(s)

$3.50
Sea Skiff--A 131/2" Fishing Skiff (Pub. No. 5523)
/Designed for the man who likes to fish.

Designed for the man who likes to fish.

by William D. Jackson,N.A.

The evolution of a boat design is sometimes just as interesting as the boat itself. Certainly that’s true of this "Sea Skiff". A long line of similar skiffs had been designed in years past, and something worthwhile was learned from each. Then, when the United States entered World War II, I joined the Emergency Rescue Boat Company—a service whose chief occupation was the rescue of flyers down at sea and, sometimes, of survivors from some torpedoed ship. Many types of skiffs were used in this service. From these craft, too, valuable lessons were learned, and all that experience has been applied to design of this "Sea Skiff"

7 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Jolly Roger--A Simple 8 Foot Skiff (Pub. No. 5547)
William D. Jackson, N.A./Despite its small size the Jolly Roger also makes an excellent yacht dinghy for father.

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

"Jolly Roger"—shades of Captain Kidd and Morgan. Here is a small boat for big or little adventurers easily built of flat bottom design for those small tars who thirst for high adventure on a pond where the sunfish lurk. Despite its small size the Jolly Roger also makes an excellent yacht dinghy for father.

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Zinky Dink a 14 ft. Steel Skiff (Pub. No. 5588)
Murray Ken/Here is the very last thing in simplicity of construction.

ZINKY DINK, by Ken Murray
Ease of handling and absolute safety probably top the list of a dozen or more reasons for the steady increase in popularity of the steel boat. Each year finds them in increasing numbers on inland lakes and streams, in use by fishermen and hunters and by just plain citizens who want the enjoyment of easy oaring or extra swiftness of outboard-motoring. It relieves the mind and makes boating more enjoyable to know that built-in air chambers make the steel boat unsinkable.  In the past, plans for construction of a tested steel boat have either been retained as a trade secret by the manufacturers, or, what is more likely, construction has appeared too difficult to be attempted by most amateur builders. Actually, the assembling of a steel job is no more complicated than following the designs of many of the small wood boats.

TINKER--by Bradley Brewer and Douglas Rolfe
The word “simple” is so overdone that it is hardly surprising to find the novice inclined to mistrust any job so labelled. In the case of “Tinker” the word is thoroughly justified. Here is the very last thing in simplicity of construction.  Actually, no special boat-building knowledge or experience is required to duplicate this little craft. Though small, “Tinker” is by no means a toy and will serve not only as an excellent general purpose rowboat but also as a neat little sailing dinghy.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
One-Sheet of Plywood (14-ft) Rowboat, A (Pub. No. 5686)
/This 11-inch hull comes out of a single sheet of 3/8-inch plywood.

Make it from one piece of plywood (14 ft.)

This 11-inch hull comes out of a single sheet of 3/8-inch plywood. We used Weldwood Royal Marine Plywood for the job. It can be put together by almost any workshopper with a minimum amount of tools and time.  It rows smartly and gets a real burst of speed from a 3 to 5-hp outboard, actually planing like a runabout. It won’t tip or trip with its generously flared sides and will take a rough clop. It can be lifted on top of a car by one man. It will carry up to four persons. The editors feel that it’s impossible to get so much water transport anywhere for so little cost.

16 pages, 2 plate(s)

$8.95
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