Small Craft Plans

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by Weston Farmer
Here's a flat-bottom grain-belt yacht--for those lazy fishing days out for sunfish or yellow perch.
$3.50
by Townsend Godsey
Natives of the Razorback country have developed these remarkable boats to float down their sparkling smallmouth bass rivers.
$7.95
by Weston Farmer
No small vessel can top the Gloucester dory as a boat able to take punishment and ask for more!
$7.95
by Edson I. Schock
Two week-ends' work and this pram is yours. High freeboard and a true bow make her able for her size.
$8.95
by Rogers Winter
No showroom skiff, this 15-footer will respond ably in just about any kind of water and weather.
$8.95
by Edson I. Schock
Young skippers with a knack for woodwork will have no difficulty building or handling this jaunty little skiff.
$8.95
by Edson I. Schock
For use as an all-purpose rowboat, kicker boat, and practical knockabout, this boat will build easily.
$7.95
by Charles G. MacGregor
A handy little packet suitable for a small outboard or air-cooled inboard engine.
$3.50
by Charles G. MacGregor
The American skiff is probably the most popular type of small boat in this country today.
$3.50
by Edson I. Schock
This skiff was designed for use on lakes or rivers, to be rowed, or to be driven with a small outboard motor.
$7.95
Shorebird (Pub. No. 7005)
Weston Farmer/Here's a flat-bottom grain-belt yacht--for those lazy fishing days out for sunfish or yellow perch.

by Weston Farmer

LOA 14' 3", BEAM 5'

Here’s a flat bottom grain-belt yacht—for those lazy fishing days out for sunfish or yellow perch. As easy building as baiting a hook, she features a built-in live well

Out on the sunfish and crappie waters of the Iowa and Minnesota sand lake country, you’ll see hundreds of board-and-slat skiffs pulled up on shore. There’s nothing fancy about these grain-belt yachts. Their claim to fame is their simplicity and economy. They may not be worthy of floor space at a boat show, and you never see one of their kind there, but for quick building, satisfaction in service and long life, they are just the ticket. Anybody who wants to go fishing badly enough can build one. For sitting in the sun over a crappie hole, you can’t beat ‘em. Shorebird here is typical of the type. You cut out a stem, bolt a couple of plain planks to the stem through temporary cleats, spread the planks with a midship mould, and then horse the planks home to the transom with a Spanish windlass. What you’ll have is not a thing of beauty, nor the most perfect of fiat-bottomed models. Nevertheless, it is a boat that you can row fairly well, which will also take a 2 or 3 hp light outboard. Her bottom rockers according to the sweep of her bent topside planking and her dimensions are dictated by lumber available in standard sizes in any local yard. She is heavy enough to weather any average chop. Just remember that as long as the forefoot of a flat-bottomed boat is loaded a little below the waterline, they act like boats. Get them cocked too high and they slam—all of them

4 page(s)

$3.50
Ozark John Boat (Pub. No. 5726)
Townsend Godsey/Natives of the Razorback country have developed these remarkable boats to float down their sparkling smallmouth bass rivers.

by Townsend Godsey

LOA 20', BEAM 441/2", DRAFT 51/4"

Natives of the Razorbackcountryhave developed these remarkable boats to float down their sparkling smallmouth bass rivers. You'll find shoal draft, easy building and pack horse qualities.

One of america’s most famous fishing boats—the Ozark John boat—is so inexpensive and simple to build that it brings fishing boat ownership within the reach of everyone. For no more than $50 worth of [1956] materials this serviceable and safe craft can be built with simple hand tools in a few evenings. Down in the hill country, the John boat has long been part of the region’s fishing lore. Natives swear by it and sportsmen from all over the country come to the Ozarks to ride leisurely down clear water streams where they pit their fishing skill against the black bass. Here the John boat is as native as the smallmouth bass itself. In use, a guide sits in the rear of a John boat plying a short steering paddle of sassafrass or ash. The fishermen sit at ease in canvas chairs and cast to right or left as likely bass water indicates. But fishermen who prefer to fish solo, guide with one hand and cast with the other. This takes a little practice but is a favorite way of the avid native angler in the Ozark country. This boat’s maneuverability is somewhat similar to that of a canoe with its own safety characteristics. It can be swamped and sunk in rapids if it is allowed to turn across the current but otherwise it is almost impossible to upset. The John boat can be anchored or tied to a rock or stump with a “cow” chain. In its modern version this unique river craft is 20 feet long with sides 12 inches high. Its counterpart, recently adapted to lake fishing, is 16 to 18 feet long, 14 inches high and fitted with oarloeks and oak endboards for attaching an outboard motor. A few clean pine boards, oak bats, a pair of two-inch oak pieces, a box of carriage bolts, a sack of nails and a few old iron wagon tires are the principal materials needed to make this boat.

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Badger (Pub. No. 5729)
Weston Farmer/No small vessel can top the Gloucester dory as a boat able to take punishment and ask for more!

by Weston Farmer

LOA 15' 1", BEAM 5' 3", DISPLACEMENT 275 POUNDS.

No small vessel can top the Gloucester dory as a bot able to take punishment and ask for more. But a true dory is the world's crankiest boat. Badger has all the dory's virtues of sea kindliness and husky charm, yet she'll be easy to power and manouever.

Badger is a modified dory suitable for the lower-powered motors. As seaworthy as the wave tops themselves, she is comfortable as an old shoe. She has enough lumber in her to last under hard service for a long time. A better all-around camp boat couldn’t be built. She weighs dry about 275 pounds, so is not a boat you can carry on the car top. She’ll require a goodly space in which to be built and this space must be dry, because rain will swell and readjust her slats until you’ll scream at patching up her bevels. All boats are like this. They must be put together dry. If your garage or basement isn’t big enough to accommodate her, build a lean-to to shelter the work. Since there are only ten boards in her hull, she builds easily and no hot bending is needed. The dory type is well known in Eastern coastal waters. Usually these boats are slab sided, narrow sterned and are built so as to “nest”; that is, the thwarts are stowed in the bottom, and one dory goes into another. By this means deck loads of these boats are carried to the Grand Banks, where they are used far offshore by the fishermen handling codfish. Such boats are seagoers, but the pure dory design is cranky and requires able handling by men who know how. By modifying the type, widening the bottom and giving the stern end some bearing, the dory is made into a docile craft for small outboards. Badger, shown in the photograph, has proved fast with small power because her waterline is narrow with a light load. As she goes down in the water, these waterlines widen and she becomes quite stiff. The more you load her, the more stable she gets. I have used the boat shown in the photo for a long time; I have had her out in anything Lake Superior could throw. I have hauled rocks for the crib of my dock until her wales had only an inch of freeboard. She is shown after one such trip on a calm day resting placidly at the end of my dock. Just enough rocks have been left aboard to tip her and show her shape. The photo was shot from the window of my design office, right over the drawing board on which her drawings were made.

9 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Midget Skiff (Pub. No. 5751)
Edson I. Schock/Two week-ends' work and this pram is yours. High freeboard and a true bow make her able for her size.

by Edson I. Schock

LOA 71/2',  BEAM 31/2'

Two week-ends’ work and about 40 bucks* and this pram is yours. High freeboard and a true bow make her able for her size.

This little boat makes a good tender for a small yacht, or a boy’s or girl’s skiff, or an auto-top-carried fishing boat for inland waters. She is light. The weight, including oarlocks and painter but no oars, is 54 pounds. She tows easily. The tow-rope pull at 8 mph is 14 pounds, and at 12 mph it’s 22 pounds. If you do not like to tow a dinghy, she is light enough for one man to lift her on to a deck. In order to take photographs of this boat in various stages of construction, the author decided to build one. Working at a leisurely rate, an hour or two at a time, it took about 36 hours. Of this, 22 were charged to the boatbuilder, and the other 14 to helpers who held things, put soap on screws, spread seam compound and were generally helpful.

16 pages, 3 plate(s)

$8.95
How to Build Sea Scout (Pub. No. 5777)
Rogers Winter/No showroom skiff, this 15-footer will respond ably in just about any kind of water and weather.

By Rogers Winter

LOA 15', BEAM 5', DRAFT 9 1/2", DISPLACEMENT 960 LBS.

No showroom skiff, this 15-footer will respond ably in just about any kind of water and weather. Plenty of seagoing sense has gone into this sturdy design

The rough-water ability of the average small utility boat is enough to make a preacher cuss and angels weep. Far too often, newspapers carry stories about people upsetting in outboard-powered skiffs and drowning. Often the accidents are caused by carelessness, but more often they are the result of a combination of high wind, rough water and boats so lacking in seaworthiness that they would be safe for use only on small millponds. An otherwise properly designed outboard skiff can be fast in smooth water, but get out into a good chop and she will just about pound her bottom out. Let the water get a little rougher and she will plunge down the face of a wave, burying her nose and throwing up ten feet of spray.
There are many bodies of water where roughness is the rule and not the exception—Long Island Sound, Barnegat Bay, the Delaware, the Chesapeake, the big sounds of the Carolinas and Georgia, the Great Lakes, Puget Sound, Mississippi Sound, the Gulf of Mexico and many others. To the sailor who llves on these waters, possession of a good outboard skiff is on a par with having an affable wife who is also a good cook. You don’t part with either—at any price. A couple of years ago, this designer built a utility skiff designed expressly for rough-water use. He has used it on fishing trips as far as ten miles out into the Gulf of Mexico, trolling for king mackerel with an 18-hp outboard on the stern. Many have been the times on these trips when some astonished boatman has surged alongside with 50 to 100 hp astride his transom and offered immediate rescue. The offers were always politely declined, usually because the rescuing boat was not so safe as the one about to be rescued. Despite encountering some fairly rough seas and high winds, the designer has yet to see this boat take a drop of water over the gunwales, except that blown in by the wind. He can also troll all day on 12 gallons of gas, whereas those owning boats with big motors need a federal subsidy to keep abreast of the gas-company bills.

14 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
13 Ft. Sailing Skiff (Pub. No. 5802)
Edson I. Schock/Young skippers with a knack for woodwork will have no difficulty building or handling this jaunty little skiff.

by Edson I. Schock

Young skippers with a knack for woodwork and a flair for sailing will have no difficulty building or handling this jaunty little skiff. All wood construction prevents her from sinking when swamped
.

This is a simple-to-build, safe skiff for youngsters. Being all wood construction she will not sink when swamped, but will be easily righted, bailed out, and afloat again in thort order. She can be run up on the beach for picnics by pulling up the centerboard and unshipping the rudder. She is built with frames at each station shown on the Lines drawing, planked on the bottom with %“ cedar, and on the sides with either %“ Douglas fir plywood or ½” or %“ cedar. The deck is plywood. The spars are solid for easy building. Any boys who can do good woodwork should build her without difficulty.

13 pages, 4 plate(s)

$8.95
14-Foot Utility Skiff (Pub. No. 5838)
Edson I. Schock/For use as an all-purpose rowboat, kicker boat, and practical knockabout, this boat will build easily.

by Edson I. Schock

For use as an all-purpose rowboat, kicker boat, and practical knockabout, this boat is especially good because she’ll build easily and her cross-planked bottom will hold up well on sandy beach use.

LOA 13 FT. 6 IN., BEAM 4 FT. 9 IN.

This skiff was designed especially to meet the demand for a husky skiff that could be built easily and  would stand hard work. She should give a good account of herself as a fisherman, tug, or general cargo and work boat, or a picnic boat. The construction, with plywood sides and cedar bottom, was selected to simplify getting the hull into shape. You have to fit only one plank per side, and you avoid the springy effect of a plywood bottom. The actual length is less than 14 feet, so that a 14-foot plywood panel could be used for the sides. To make her exactly 14 feet you’d need to buy a 16-foot panel. The transom is supported with two knees instead of the usual one. They carry the thrust of the motor to keelsons—-running almost the full length of the boat. For power, a 7½ hp motor should be plenty. A smaller motor would push her along all right, but would not leave reserve power for towing.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Factotum--A Power Skiff (Pub. No. 7060)
Charles G. MacGregor/A handy little packet suitable for a small outboard or air-cooled inboard engine.

Designed by Charles G. MacGregor

LOA 15 ft. 6 in., BEAM 5 ft., draft 2 ft.

These plans show a 15'6" utility power boat, one of these handy little packets in which a small outboard or air-cooled inboard engine may be installed. This is not a speed boat in any sense of the word, therefore do not expect speeds in excess of 7 miles an hour, and do not use any power plant over 6 hp. It was designed as a utility tender for a large schooner yacht, and as such, is expected to perform a multiplicity of duties.    It is light enough to lift aboard and stow on deck, has good carrying capacity and therefore would be extremely useful around a summer camp.

2 page(s)

$3.50
Beaver--An All-Purpose Skiff (Pub. No. 7062)
Charles G. MacGregor/The American skiff is probably the most popular type of small boat in this country today.

11'8" All Purpose Sldff By Charles G: MacGregor

LOA 11' 8 in., BEAM 4 ft. 4 in., DRAFT (LEEBOARD DOWN) 1 ft. 6 in.

The American skiff is probably the most popular type of boat in this country today.    Many thousands are in use and they are to be found in almost every corner of the United States and Canada: These vary in construction and form from the simplest with flat bottom and straight vertical sides to the vee-bottom and flared sides or the beautifully built planked up models, now unfortunately seldom seen or built. They are our most numerous utility boat though most of them lack the all-around qualifications because of their absolute simplicity of form and build. A utility or all-purpose boat must serve in a wide variety of duties and perform them with the least amount of effort or power whether that power is delivered by oars, sail or motor. These qualifications are listed below: a; stron, b; light weight, c; low cost, d; low upkeep, e; simple and easy to build; f; easy to row with one or more aboard, g; sail well to windwrd in choppy water; h; have profvision for small outboard engine; j. suitable for small inboard engine.
In addition to all these qualifications it may easily be transported an a trailer, on top of a car or on the deck of a larger boat; be readily towed astern of an auxiliary or power cruiser without too much drag, and many other duties too numerous to mention here.

3 page(s)

$3.50
15-Ft. Skiff (Pub. No. 5881)
Edson I. Schock/This skiff was designed for use on lakes or rivers, to be rowed, or to be driven with a small outboard motor.

by Edson I. Schock

LOA 15 ft., beam about 46 in.

This skiff was designed for use on lakes or rivers, to be rowed, or to be driven with a small outboard motor.

She is not intended to be a high-hspeed boat. A 5 hp motor should drive her 6 or 7 miles an hour, and this is about as fast as she will want to go. She is an exceptionally easy boat to build. There is no twist in any plank, and the curves are long and easy enough to need no steaming of lumber.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
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