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Rob Roy Canoe--How to Build It, The (Pub. No. 5494)

by Adrien Niesen

(Excerpted from Practical Boat Building for Amateurs)

From the opening paragraphs. "In this chapter it is proposed to show how to build a Rob Roy canoe, giving its dimensions and mentioning its peculiarities.  Every one knows that a canoe is only a modified boat reduced to its smallest dimension, and it is, in fact, very much the same as the skiff just described to build, with the exception that it requires much more careful work, because, as it is small, the parts will not stand the same "dodging" in the event of an error being made. There are many kinds of canoes made, though they are all on the same principle; some of them are intended for sailing purposes, and are, therefore, made so large, and have such a weight of ballast, that they are really boats in every respect, retaining a sort of fancied resemblance to the justly celebrated Rob Roy. The beauty of a canoe is its extreme simplicity and yet efficiency, so that when a great complexity is produced with sliding keels, topmasts, rudders, mizenmasts, etc., all the quality of this kind of boat disappears.  Besides which, the portability of a canoe is, or should be, a leading feature, and not in any way to be despised. Of the different kinds of canoes that have been brought out since the introduction of the Rob Roy, none have really surpassed it for general travel, though in special descriptions of travel there are some which are superior.  For instance, the bluff lines of a Rob Roy make it a rather heavy craft to paddle against the current of a fairly swift stream, and so here a Ringleader has advantages; but the Ringleader is not nearly so handy as the Rob Roy on account of its great length-viz., 17 ft. 6 in., and some have been made as long as 22 ft.  For this reason it is not nearly so quickly turned, but it was claimed to stand rough water better, which, however, has never been really proved.  The Nautilus, which is the other variety which is most adopted, is a decided improvement on the Ringleader, standing very rough water much better and is far more manageable, but it has the same disadvantage as the Rob Roy in being heavier to paddle.  All these varieties have, in their turn, given birth to many others, and there are at least eleven distinct varieties of the original canoe, besides a great number of nondescript arrangements, used for fast cr peculiar work, as racing and sporting.  In a manual like this, where only a few pages can be devoted to one particular craft, it would be impossible to describe all the varieties; but for general work an ordinary Rob Roy is best."

12 pages

$7.95
Junior-- An All Purpose Dinghy (Pub. No. 5513)

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

Junior is a type of boat usually known as a yacht dinghy, but there the comparison ends. Yacht dinghys are notoriously cranky and hard to row, but Junior is of such ample dimensions and so carefully designed that it rows quite easily, carries three and, even four adults, propels well with small outboard motors, and could even be sailed, if fitted out with simple sailing equipment. Last but not least, Junior makes an excellent car top boat for fishing or hunting anywhere, since it is lightweight, leakproof and easily handled afloat or ashore.

12 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Little Chief-- A 15 Foot Canvas Canoe (Pub. No. 5515)

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

"Little Chief" is a canoe with many virtues, ideally adapted to quick, easy construction. Canoes are not easy to build, but here is one example of the red man’s boat that can be made of ordinary materials and covered with canvas for a fraction of the cost of conventional canoes. It has attractive molded lines and may be built either as a paddling model or, with slight changes, adapted for use with small outboard motors.

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Sea Sled--A Hunting Boat in Masonite, The (Pub. No. 5516)

by C.L. Meehan

Seldom is a boat planned for the ordinary fellow not too handy with tools who is convinced that he could not shape wood into the complicated curves and angles that many designers delight in recommending.  For such men here is a boat that is simple in design. It is plainly not in a class with the usual flat-bottomed tubs so familiar on any body of water. No! This is a real sea sled. Modern! Attractive! And most efficient!  The sea sled or hydroplanetype is the only known water vehicle that, when engine driven, lifts itself clear of the water and rides on a cushion of air. The United States and British Navies have successfully used it for years.  The framework of this boat is covered with tough pressed wood (tempered Masonite, 1/8 inch thick). This remarkable material is proof against weather, acid, insects, termites, mold, decay, etc. It is pliable yet tough and can be bent into curves that are not extremely acute. It comes in 6, 8 and 10 foot lengths, 4 foot in width. Prospective builders may use plywood, instead.

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
All-Purpose Portable Boat in Frame and Canvas, An (Pub. No. 5517)

by William D. Jackson, N.A.

Speeds of from five to thirty-five miles an hour, trolling speeds that delight the fisherman to speeds rivaling racing craft, are possible with the water ways companion described here. For these speeds It requires only from one to ten horsepower, and it may be carried atop an auto for sport in any location. It offers a general purpose boat that fulfills every small-craft need. Weighing 125 pounds, the hull is not only easily loaded and transported atop the auto, but, due to its efficient design and seaworthy proportions, it travels farther and faster on less gas and rows with a minimum of effort. The canvas covered hull is permanently leak proof, so that the boat is always ready for instant use. It is especially well adapted to home workshop construction.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Jitter Bug--A Water Bicycle (Pub. No. 5518)

Built for exercise or sport, “Jitter Bug” is a hybrid creation combining qualities of both the bicycle and boat. Propelled easily with its twin paddles, with speeds up to 10 m.p.h. Jitter Bug will buck strong currents, operate in water depths as low asthree inches, and is easier to handle than any boat. No practice is necessary to operate and due to its unique design, tripping or tipping is impossible regardless of passenger weight, making it safe for children or adults.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
White Duck--A 14' Skiff (Pub. No. 5519)

This universal flat bottom rowboat (let’s call it the “White Duck”)--is one of the most versatile craft that can be built. Its simple, inexpensive construction and substantial design make it a safe boat for sport or recreation anywhere. It is especially well adapted to easy construction and is designed to be built from 14-foot lumber normally available almost anywhere.  Easily rowed or propelled by small outboard motors from 1 to 6 hp., it is seaworthy and stable on any waters and has the capacity of much larger boats.

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Kingfisher--A 9' Pram (Pub. No. 5520)

Originally developed separately by Scandinavian fishermen and Dutchmen hundreds of years ago for use upon rough open waters of the Old World, the pram reflects the qualities of these hardy seafarers, for it is exceptionally practical and useful under all conditions. This modernized version of the pram, which is here called the “Kingfisher,” is perhaps the most versatile craft that may be found. It rows easily, sails well, and propels nicely with small outboard motors. It weighs only 90-100 lbs. and therefore is easily handled and carried atop any auto for sport and adventure limited only by road maps. It is wide beamed and due to the commodious design its capacity is the equal of much larger boats. Casting or still fishing is easily accomplished standing upright in it. This pram will safely seat three persons. All construction details have been simplified to permit easy fabrication and material costs are easily within the reach of everyone.

10 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Blue Bill--A 13' Kayak/Canoe (Pub. No. 5521)

Combining the features of both kayak and canoe, “Blue Bill” is offered to those out-of-doors men who hunt or the sportsmen who need an ultra lightweight portable boat for use upon any waters. Besides being usable for building a double-end paddling model, a few changes permit the plans to be used for making a canoe that will accommodate outboard motors up to 6 hp. for swift, speedy transportation on any stream or waterway. Weighing only 75 lbs. complete, “Blue Bill” is easily transported atop an auto anywhere. All details of “Blue Bill” have been simplified for easy fabrication and the construction cost is within reach of everyone’s pocketbook.

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Handy Andy--A 10' Folding Boat (Pub. No. 5524)

Outdoor sportsmen encounter numerous waterways or adverse conditions where it is impossible to use the ordinary rigid boat or where its use is restricted, making it more of a liability than a convenience on a trip. The portable folding boat is not meant to dispense completely with the rigid boat, but to supplement its uses and to offer a ready means of water transportation where conventional type boats are excluded. Weighing only 80 lbs., simple and easy to construct, easily rowed or propelled with small outboard motors from 1 to 5 hp., this portable folding boat provides a lifetime of usage, under conditions unapproachable by conventional craft. The hull may be folded or unfolded in one minute’s time. It will stow away inside any auto, airplane, house trailer, or it may be packed under the arm and carried easily.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Stubby--An Elegant Punt (Pub. No. 5543)

by Edwin Monk

This little boat is similar to one designed by the author for Pacific Motorboat and published in the February, 1930, issue of that magazine. It has proven quite popular and a large number have been built. This boat was 8’ 6” long with a beam of 4’, carried four people nicely and made a light, seaworthy little tender or rowboat. The new design has been simplifled somewhat, and has but one knuckle instead of two, and is a little longer being 9’ by 4’. In ease of construction, this type of boat is excelled only by the simple square-end punt, to which it is in every way superior.

8 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Saunterer--A 12' Rowboat (Pub. No. 5545)

While not quite so easy to build as a flat-bottom boat, the V-bottom type, like “Saunterer,” (sometimes called skipjacks or deadrise boats) have so many excellent characteristics that any additional work over that required for building a flatbottom craft is well worth while. This is especially true if the boat in question is to be propelled by oars.  “Saunterer” is exactly 1 in. over 12 ft. in length. The length on the water line, that is between stations 0 and 5  is 11ft. 4 in. The beam is 3 ft. 9 in., and the draft is 6 in. The freeboard at the bow is 18 in; and at the stern this height is 14 in. From these bare figures, you can gather that the boat will be dry and buoyant. Boats with low freeboard are quite all right in smooth water, but are unsafe when the wind blows.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Building a Simple Flat-Bottom Rowboat (Pub. No. 5546)

The average rowboat is not entirely suitable for use with the outboard boat motor. The boat described in this article has been designed for the following: Perfect balance with the weight of the motor on the stern; a substantial stern and parts to carry the weight and hold up against vibration and strain; an easily riding bow that does not ship much water when the going is rough; large substantial seats; a front deck giving a motorboat appearance; light weight; ease of rowing, etc. The use of a motor on such a rowboat permits the builder to get into the motor-boat class to some extent, and a few of the refinements of the latter are embodied in the design. While this particular boat has been designed especially for use with an outboard motor, still the fundamentals of general rowboat practice have been closely followed.

10 pages, 1 plate(s)

$7.95
Building a Car-Top Boat (Pub. No. 5548)

by Edward R. Lucas

If you're a lake fisherman who likes frequent changes of scenery, this light weight car-top boat will permit you to drop a line in any body of water to which your car is able to transport you. Or if a non-fisherman who just likes to spend an occasional day on the water, your radius of enjoyment will be expanded well beyond its present limits. Although an ideal twoperson boat, the semi-V bottom and pram type construction make possible the accommodation of three individuals without swamping.

7 pages, 1 plate(s)

$6.95
Buddy--A 13 Foot Uitlity Boat (Pub. No. 5549)

"Buddy", a general utility boat, was designed to meet the greatest possible variety of purposes and to serve each one well. With an over-all length of 13 feet and a generous beam of 56 inches, the hull seats three or four passengers and performs with stability and seaworthiness in rough or smooth water. Outboard motors from 1 to 6 hp. will propel this craft speedily and economically, while rowing it is easy. For those who love sailing, “Buddy” may be rigged as a sailboat and it will perform comparably with regulation sailing craft.  The construction requires marine plywood, making the boat easy to build, inexpensive, and producing a craft that is light in weight, easily transported and permanently leakproof under all conditions.

16 pages, 1 plate(s)

$8.95
Snuffy An All-Purpose 11 ft Car Top Boat (Pub. No. 5589)

by William Jackson

"Snuffy" comes of a long line of car top boats that had varying characteristics— some were too bulky, others too small. This latest descendant not only presents a hull adapted to wide general usage, but fulfills all requirements for transient travel. It can be carried wherever autos may penetrate, being light in weight; is easy and inexpensive to build, easily rowed or propelled by a small outboard motor of from 1 to 10 h.p. Proportions are small but compact for ample accommodations and the boat is leakproof under all conditions if properly made.

12 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Gypsy a 15 ft Strip-Built Canoe (Pub. No. 5605)

You don’t have to steam bend any ribs to build this sturdy, light-weight canoe. Construction is modern and simplified using plywood forms.

While canoes have always had a greater appeal than perhaps any other type of boat, especially to those who like to hunt and fish, the thought of having to steam and bend in the fifty some odd ribs necessary in their construction discourages most men from attempting to build one. There are no bent ribs in this fifteen-footer; edge-nailed strip construction is used with plywood bulkhead moulds; the same type construction as is being so successfully used now aboard even large boats to give all the lightness, strength and grace associated with round-bilged boats without the trouble of steam bending

10 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Showboat a 16.5 ft Bicycle Powered River boat (Pub. No. 5608)

by Douglas Rolfe

This miniature “Showboat” is an ideal camp afloat for those who like to spend vacation days on lake or river. Economical to operate, it permits fun on limited budgets.

For generations the old stern-wheelers have been industriously churning their way up and down the great rivers of America, and even today the river Steamboat is a familiar sight at many of the old Mississippi landings. Showboat brings a small and simplified edition of these famous boats within the practical building scope of anyone interested in lake or river craft, and offers, besides novelty, extraordinary economy and remarkable cabin capacity for so small a craft. The advantages of the design are plentiful. In the first place it requires nothing beyond ordinary carpentering to build and no very special skill at that trade. Then again it provides the maximum of cabin space and yet draws so little water that it can be run into a safe landing wherever a few inches of water are available. On top of all that. unless it is engine operated, it costs nothing in the way of fuel to run. Showboat is powered by the crew and passengers. Two old bike frames, mounted side by side, are coupled quite simply, without a difficult conversion job, to the twin stern wheel so that two ordinary persons can comfortably propel this unique ship anywhere they choose to go. A small motor can of course be substituted for the "exercycles."

10 pages, 5 plate(s)

$7.95
Silas a 15 ft Utility Skiff (Pub. No. 5609)

by J.A. Emmett

The very name implies strength and sterling old-fashioned qualities—all of which this design has. Larger and more strongly built than the usual skiff it is too heavy, of course, for car-top carrying but will make a fine outfit for general use and fishing, when its stiffness, ability, and roominess will be appreciated. "Silas" will row more easily than the average boat her size, and drive nicely , up to 6 or 8 miles an hour, with a 2 to 3½ h.p. outboard. The model and size is well suited to inboard power and with a small air or a water-cooled inboard motor will prove a very able outfit; or she will sail well if fitted with a centerboard. In all she’s a darn useful boat to build and have around whatever way you decide to power her—oars, outboard, inboard, or sail.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Jibe-Cat--A 16 ft Decked Racing Canoe (Pub. No. 5619)

If you're looking for a safe comfortable boat for pleasant afternoon sailing don’t build "Jibe-Cat". But if you’re in search of speed coupled with excitement and thrills and are willing to sacrifice comfort, this racing canoe is guaranteed to give satisfaction. All gear has been made as simple as possible consistent with maximum performance, and most of the fittings can, if necessary, be homemade of odds and ends. The construction is not difficult but since strength must be coupled with lightness, accurate workmanship and careful fitting is necessary if the boat is to look and perform her best. Just do right by the gal and she’ll attract favorable attention in the fastest company.

16 pages, 5 plate(s)

$8.95
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