Small Craft Plans

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Scaup--A Wildfowler's Dream Come True (Pub. No. 5774)

by Roger P. Smith

LOA 15'31/2" BEAM 65"

No tomfoolery about this duckboat. The design has one purpose—taking duck hunters to deep water and bringing them back safely and comfortably in 15’ of sound, honest boat
.

Take the high, flaring bows and handsome, sweeping sheer of the Maine-coast lobsterman; add the F broad, beamy lines of the well-known VanDyke skiff and the slightly wedged, easy-running bottom of the Amesbury dory; shake well and assemble in the best tradition of modern plywood construction—and you have a boat to warm the cockles of any duck shooter’s heart. Such a boat is Scaup. From the first of five half models to the last carefully drawn line in her plans, her designers have had nothing but late-fall and early-winter duck shooting in mind, and everything in her makeup has been finely tuned to this most rugged of sports. Let’s examine some of these conditions. It’s a time-honored conviction among wildfowlers that the best shooting invariably occurs when the weather’s not fit for man or beast. A good deepwater duckboat, therefore, must be first and foremost a good heavy-weather performer. Where better to find this kind of ability than in the true Down East lobstermen—boats that traditionally ply the choppy, reef-strewn waters of northern New England summer and winter alike? Scaup has the high bows to turn away choppy seas, a fine forefoot for easy entry and generous flair for good lift. Should conditions sharpen to such a degree that reduced speed is indicated, Scaup should not wallow or bobble helplessly, for her lines show great stability and sea-kindllness. Furthermore, with locker space for everything “and everything in its place,” as the saying goes, her trim can be well established with little chance for the load to shift at the least opportune moment. Speaking of load, Scaup was designed to be a workhorse. She will carry up to 100 of the special folding decoys we regularly use; ship all of our guns, gear and box lunches and stow her own canvas cover, tools, oars, anchors, lines and so on and still leave every inch of cockpit and seat space free and clear. Stowage space under the deck completely protects all of your shooting gear, extra clothing and so forth from spray and provides for two Cruise-A-Day gas tanks. Gas lines are carried aft through the amidship bulkheads and can be locked in the after seat lockers to prevent unauthorized use of the boat.

14 pages, 6 plate(s)

$8.95
Build a Dinghy to fit (Pub. No. 5788)

A featherweight plywood dinghy, plans for which can be readily altered to fit individual requirements.

Here is a dinghy specially adapted to being carried on deck—not only is it so light it is lifted aboard without effort, but the lines are quite simple and so arranged that the builder can easily alter them to fit the particular space requirements of the deck of his own boat. This little dinghy need never be towed. Construction is no problem, only a few days’ spare time being required. The original boat as shown in the drawings and photographs was built with 1/4-inch marine plywood planking and transoms, and 3/4-inch framework. It weighed, complete, 48 pounds without a keel but including seats, floor, and paint. The weight could be still further reduced by using 5/8-inch or 1/2-inch framework or by using thinner plywood, so it is possible to build the boat as light as 35 pounds without decreasing the size. With the dimensions as shown in the drawings and table of offsets the boat is approximately as large as can be built from 8-foot lengths of plywood. In fact, two sheets of 4- by 8-foot plywood will suffice for the entire construction, the seats and floor being made from the left-over pieces.

9 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Optimist Pram, The (Pub. No. 5789)

Though less than 8 feet long, the Optimist-Pram helps boys and girls develop the qualities of competent boatmen.

Boating has had an appeal since the beginning of history. Archaeologists have discovered signs of boats back into the Stone Age. Floating on rafts or simple dugouts along streams and shores was one of the earliest forms of transportation, pre-dating the wheel and axle a couple of thousand years. With water covering 70 percent of the earth’s surface, boating helped the spread of civilization. Recent discoveries in the Pyramids show that finished boats with masts and sails were enjoyed in Egypt over 4.000 years ago, and boating together with fishing and hunting were the chief recreations and sports of those days. With the help of sailing ships the western world was discovered, colonized and made independent. Almost no other sport has such an important history. Every youngster likes boats, first to float ‘em in a handy mudpuddle after a shower, perhaps with simple little paper sails. Then bigger ones in some park lake or along some convenient shore. And later, to save effort, in a rowboat or canoe to sail leisurely downwind with the aid of an umbrella or such. And this was perhaps followed by an improvised sail. How many of you remember your first great thrill in your first small sailboat, of feeling the lift when the breeze filled the sail and the boat responded to your movement of the tiller? And then realized after your first two tacks that you had actually worked to windward of your starting point. You then began to get sailing in your blood.

9 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Build this 15.5 ft Sportsman's Canoe (Pub. No. 5797)

by Bruce N. Crandall

This developable-surface design for the first time, permits the amateur builder to construct a really serviceable canoe from marine plywood
.

A developable-surface design is one with no compound curvature to the planking. The bull form is made up entirely of portions of conical and cylindrical surfaces. Without developable surfaces, thin plywood planking would not lie smoothly but would tend to buckle at various points so that, no matter how expert the builder, a poorly built canoe would result. The conventional method of building a canoe with bent ribs and thin planking covered with canvas has always been impractical for the amateur. No one can do a good job of this type without the canoe forms that the factories use, which of course are practical for them because they use them many times, not just once. Carrying capacity, stability, ease of paddling and handling of this sportsman’s canoe compari favorably with the average 16-footer. Its over—all length is 15’ 8” so it can be planked with 16’ lengths of plywood. The sawn-frame construction is similar to that used on most plywood boats and is extrcmely strong in proportion to weight. Both temporary and permanent repairs will be easier than with any other type of canoe construction. With the use of marine plywood and modern wood preservative it can be made to outlast any other type of canoe construction. For long trips on open waters it is a little small but is about the right size for wilderness trips where many portages arc encountered. In this design, the bow and stern are exactly alike so that it can be paddled in either direction. It will be noticed that the plans and list of materials give many choices as to size and kind of materials used in construction, and the weight will vary accordingly. Using the lightest materials specified in the list of materials, weight will be about 65 pounds, including seats but without inwales or thwart.

12 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Whistler--A 10 ft. Duckboat (Pub. No. 5803)

by Henry P. Megargee

A kissin’ cousin of the Barnegat sneakbox and a whole lot easier for the amateur to build, this plywood, flat-bottom craft is the most likely companion for the lone hunter or fisherman
.

If you are familiar with that wonderful little duck hunting boat, the Barnegat sneakbox look at the plan view of "Whistler". You would think it the same boat with her nose sawed off. Actually, the boats are close kin and have several common features. Both have: a high crown deck giving leg room but at the same time a low silhouette; a full deck with a small cockpit just wide enough for the reclining hunter to lie concealed; adequate deck space astern with a rack to carry a large flock of decoys; a hatch that locks on to convert the boat into a locker for gear; and finally, a high-peaked, collapsible breakwater or spray shield that keeps the hunter dry as a bone when going to windward in a blow. One big difference between "Whistler" and a true Barnegat sneakbox is the matter of ease of construction. The latter has the advantage of a feather edge and spoon-shaped bottom, but is a difficult boat to build with planks and next to impossible for the amateur builder with plywood, the principal material used in "Whistler". "Whistler’s" bottom is flat. She has sheer sides that flare outward with plenty o sheer fore and aft, both features designed to give her lift in a seaway. Her deck is bent in a simple arc with a constant radius so that there is no compound curvature to worry about. When you have examined the plans and read the descriptive text, you will see that anyone with a rudimentary knowlege of woodworking and ordinary hand tools can build her.

10 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
How I Built an Aluminum Canoe (Pub. No. 5804)

by Emil E. Brodbeck

Aluminum and small boats are made for each other. And it’s no mystery material to use

Since its brisk entrance into the boating picture, aluminum has continued to dominate the smallboat field. Lightness, strength, lack of maintenance problems, long life are some of the reasons why unit sales of aluminum boats in the 10’to-14’ class continue to outpace all others by a considerable margin. Not so well known even after 15 years of universal use is the fact that aluminum is no mystery material. It can be cut, shaped, formed and fitted by amateurs with no other tools than would be necessary to build with wood. And the use of aluminum doors and storm windows has filled local hardware stores all over the country with aluminum extrusions, sheets and fastenings in all sizes. These are ready material accessories to an aluminum design. With these facts in hand, I decided to pioneer and build my own boat out of aluminum. The result is a prototype craft that satisfies me and holds out exciting promise for any backyard builder.

12 pages

$7.95
Lark, The (Pub. No. 5812)

by William Dickey

A particularly shapely plywood utility runabout.

Chemical research, while usually not associated with boats or boat building, has made possible the construction of the boat presented herewith. In the construction of this boat, a special waterproof plywood has been used for planking, decking and for the transverse frames. This material is a rather recent development of the lumber industry and offers to the boat builder a new material with which to experiment and to utilize in various forms of work. This waterproof plywood must not be confused with the ordinary varieties of plywood on the market. The ordinary plywood is made with a glue which when subjected to extreme moisture conditions, as encountered in a boat, will let go and cause the plywood to come apart. The waterproof variety of plywood is bonded with a special adhesive which is impervious to water and can safely be used in boat construction. This waterproof plywood has been used in the construction of the original “Lark” and proves very satisfactory. The “Lark” is a general purpose utility boat having a tendency towards higher speeds. She is light in weight, due to the plywood construction, and of such form that she planes nicely with a motor of approximately 10 h.p. Speeds of from fifteen to twentyfive m.p.h should be obtained with the average outboard motor. “The “Lark” handles excellently in calm water and will stand a moderate amount of hard driving in heavy water, although she is not particularly designed or suited for rough water.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Viking--A 12' 6" Plywood Uitlity Boat, The (Pub. No. 5815)

by Wm. Jackson

Viking is a utility or general purpose boat designed to embrace most every use yo which a small boat may be placed and perform each well.

Although short in over all length, the hull is roomy and light enough in weight to be carried atop an auto or trailer if more desirable. Due to the efficient underwater line, rowing is effortless and small outboard motors from 1 to 6-H.P. will propel this craft further and faster with less gas. It is easily adapted to a small sail boat. With the hull partially decked over with plywood, center board, rudder and sail rig attached “Viking” will sail to windward in choppy or smooth waters at a surprising speed. and with all of these uses remain stable and seawworthy upon any waters a small craft of these dimensions is allowable. Waterproof plywood is used for planking and not only produces a light weight craft, and one that will remain leakproof under a wide variety of conditions, but the use of this material eliminates labor and simplifies construction. The completed weight of “Viking” will approximate 150 pounds. Dimensions are snch to accommodate the greatest number of passengers in safety and comfort-—in short the ideal all purpose boat.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Zipper--An 8-Ft. Catamaran Ski-Boat (Pub. No. 5818)

by William D. Jackson

LOA 8 FT, BEAM 4 FT.

This 15-hour do-it-yourself boat project fills enthusiast's bill as planing sports boat, water skier, racer, ski-tow boat, surfboard, fishing raft or diving plantform
.

Zipper rides like a pair of water skis except that you can maneuver like a star in a water thrill show by gently nudging the tiller bar with your feet Your hands are free to operate the throttle and apply plenty of body-english to your turns. Speeds up to 36 mph are possible with 18-hp motors, but even a little 5-hp kicker will perform to please the most jaundiced boating fan. To get this performance, Zipper was designed with twin hulls forward, leading into a conventional planing surface aft. Construction is of exterior-grade AC fir plywood and fir lumber. All materials are available from your local lumberyard or hardware store and should be on hand when you begin construction. No great amount of workshop space is necessary, because the framing will be assembled directly on the 1/2-in. plywood deck

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Let's Go Barreling (Pub. No. 5819)

by Merle E. Dowd

Nobody goes along just for the ride in a barrel--boat everybody walks and has a barrel of fun

The easiest way to describe the barrel-boat is to say that it s like a paddle-wheel steamboat without the steamboat. And, if you re looking for a new water sport that demands teamwork and coordination, yet provides plenty of excitement for the whole gang, you ll agree that your next boating project should be a barrel-boat. The crew members (any number from one to seven have operated the barrel) maneuver by shifting their weight. To turn right,the crew shifts to the right and the boat heels slightly, and turns. With practice and everybody working together, the barrel can be turned in a 50-ft. circle.

4 pages, 1 plate(s)

$6.95
Cap'n Jack (Pub. No. 5821)

by William D. Jackson

Every kid's a captain when he takes his turn at the wheel of his very own tugboat to seek maritime adventure.

Cap'n Jack was specifically designed for young 'uns to use while going to the rescue of fair-haired maidens, aiding vessels in distress, or closing in on hapless smugglers. But, if you can get the tugboat crew to sleep late some morning, it will only take you 15 minutes to remove the superstructure  and there s a roomy, open boat for a quick fishing trip. You can build the boat and cabin during a weekend, using fir exterior plywood and ordinary fir lumber from your nearest lumber-yard. By brewing up the tugboat extras such as horn, bell, and lights from items in your scrap bin, you can build Cap'n Jack for $45 to $50, depending on local prices.

NOTE: Because of the windage caused by the superstructure and the design of the simple rowboat hull, this boat should only be used on VERY calm days and in VERY sheltered waters.

10 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Can't Sink (Pub. No. 5822)

by C.T. Allen

LOA 9.5 FT, BEAM 47 IN., WEIGHT 85 LBS, CAPACITY 3 ADULTS.
91/2-ft., fiber glass dinghy.

Here's the sturdy, lightweight, fishing dinghy you ve been looking for. Frame is encased in fiber glass, thus making each frame member a rectangular beam, and the color goes all the way through so you ll have no hull painting problems. Between the hull's interior and exterior layers of fiber glass is a layer of 1/16-in. fiber glass mat, the whole bonded together with polyester resin to give you a sturdy, leakproof, lightweight boat. For safety s sake, air chambers built into each seat give approximately 3000 cu. in. of air space within the hull.

8 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Pedal Cat (Pub. No. 5829)

by William D. Jackson

You can pedal or power this water cruising bicycle.

Pedal Cat is a paddle-wheel driven catamaran which you operate much the same as a bicycle. It will navigate in about 3½ in. of water, is silent, and can be used upon protected waters anywhere. Resort operators will find this water craft a popular addition to a fleet of rentable boats. If you prefer to power it with a small outboard motor, the paddle wheel may be removed and the motor clamped to an engine support board. Simply lock the outboard motor in the dead-ahead position and steer with the handlebar-controlled rudder. The materials needed to build Pedal Cat are exterior fir plywood and pine, fir or hemlock solid stock available at local lumber yards. The paddle-wheel foot cranks, bearings and handle bar are made of ordinary standard pipe and pipe fittings available at local hardware or plumbing stores.  The pontoons measure almost 10 ft. in length. If 4 x 10 ft. plywood panels are available, well and good; if, however, your lumber dealer stocks only 4 x 8 ft. panels, it’s an easy matter to butt join the pieces with reinforcing lap blocks.

18 pages, 2 plate(s)

$8.95
Jump'n-Jack--The Jack-Knife Trailer Boat (Pub. No. 5830)

by Berthel Madsen

LOA 9 FT. 7 IN., BEAM 3 FT. 10 1/2 IN., WEIGHT 120 LBS., SEATING CAPACITY 2 PERSONS.

Fishermen-Campers! Here is your boat and trailer combined into one easy-to-build project.

As a boat, you can use oars or outboard motor up to 51/2 hp. Simply folding it over like a knife changes it into a one-wheel trailer for carrying your fishing or camping gear. But that’s not all—-slipping the wheel into the keel makes it easy to portage the whole unit right down to the water’s edge, using the oars as handles. As a trailer, there’s 40 cu. ft. of storage for fishing and camping gear, food and clothing. Not only is this boat functional, it’s easy to build. There’s no form necessary, and you build the boat in one section, sawing it in two when complete. All in all, it’s an ideal boat to build.

11 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Glide-Easy (Pub. No. 5832)

by William D. Jackson

LOA 15 FT., BEAM 36 IN., WEIGHT 75 LB., SEATING CAPACITY 2 PERSONS.

A rugged, quickly built canoe.

If you have ever struggled with the oars of a heavy, slow-moving rowboat—and then paddled a swift, high maneuverable canoe—you can appreciate why many true sportsmen prefer canoes. But, too often, the multi-ribbed conventional canoe is not only hard to build but too thin-skinned for hard usage. This design teams up plywood and fiber glass to produce a tough, scrape-proof canoe you can build in one-tenth the time it would take you to turn out a conventional canoe. The use of only one frame offsets the extra weight of using plywàod, so that this canoe is still light enough for comfortable portage. Glide-Easy can be built with a square stem for use with an outboard motor or as a double-ender for paddling.

10 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Sea Midge--Snug, Small, Three-way Pram (Pub. No. 5833)

by William D. Jackson

LOA 8 FT., BEAM 52 IN., WEIGHT OF HULL 65 LBS., SPARS 10 LBS., SEATING CAPACITY 2 PERSONS.

May be rowed or sailed or adapted for use with outboard motors of from 1 o 3 hp.

Designed with a convex bottom for maximum speed whether powered by sail, outboard motor or oars, Sea Midge is modeled on an Old World boat originally developed as a yacht dinghy for use upon the North Sea. It is an excellent all-around workhorse and is light enough to be carried anywhere. Construction of Sea Midge is simplicity itself.

5 pages, 4 plate(s)

$7.95
Rob Roy--A Combination Canoe-Kayak (Pub. No. 5836)

by Weston Farmer

She’s a combination boat with two sheer heights. You’ll use her as a one- or two-man canoe, a one-man rowboat, or even as a large kayak.

LOA 15 ft., BEAM 42 IN., DRAFT 41/2 IN.

An ardent canoeist and black fly devotee dropped into my Powder Island boat shop up on Nipigon Bay, Canada, last  summer. “I gotta have a boat that doesn’t exist,” sez he. “It’s got to be as good as a canoe, but lighter. I may want to paddle her as a kayak, the better for shooting come fall. If I’m alone and toting a good camp load, rowing will cover more miles in a day than paddling. She’ll have to be light because I may want to strap her to the pontoons of my Beaver and fly inland. I’ll want her to be stiff, too.” He allowed as how he was going to hang around my boat and stoke at my galley stove until I designed him a special sort of craft for cartop and camp use. So it didn’t take me long to galvanize the idea of Rob Roy. She is named for the famed Scottish canoe of several generations ago in which Robert Louis Stevenson crossed Europe on its canals and lakes, and about which he wrote so charmingly in The Adventures of Rob Roy*. This Rob Roy in no way resembles Stevenson's boat, except that she is small, slim, and light. Our current Rob Roy fills my friend’s variety of needs to a T, and is built of plywood which Stevenson never heard of. Her main function will be as a canoe; she’ll serve as a kayak; she’ll row easier than a St. Lawrence skiff, though she is really none of these. You will note from the arrangement plan that Rob Roy is a double-ender. And, if you want to use her as a canoe as most people will, she is fitted with cane canoe seats. Placed as shown, these seats will properly balance two persons for team paddling on long treks. Between paddiers you can accommodate a goodly load—up to 400 pounds of tent, gun, food and gear. She’ll be tender when light, of course—all light craft with dead rise are—but load her down, and she stiffens surprisingly and is much stiffer than a canoe. Yet she moves easily under paddle. Her steeved-up bow will not dump seas inboard as a canoe’s bow does. When camping alone you sit on the bow thwart or seat, the narrow end of the craft is astern, and your load forward. Balanced thus, normal oneman canoe action prevails. But I like my friend’s idea of rowing when single-handing it. It’s less tiring faster going safer So I have shown permanent rowlocks. Seven-foot silver spruce oars in loose, leathered oarlocks - (the only safe oarlock) will complement your equipment. Kayak cranks will not fare badly on a seat placed as shown, using a double-bladed paddle and facing forward. Fine for marsh crawling, casting and camera work.

*The correct title for Stevenson's fine book is "An Inland Voyage", and it is availble in reprint in The Shellback's Library from The Press at Toad Hall.

13 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
Yo Ho!--A Plywood Cartopper (Pub. No. 5841)

by Weston Farmer

Designed with easy bends in her planking this boat is light enough to be tossed atop your car. Cheap, too.

LOA 13 FT., BEAM 50 IN.

YO HO! is not the best looking boat I have lifted from my drawing board these past 35 years—not by a long shot. But she very successfully incorporates extreme ease of building with very nice water feel. As my good old friend Billy Atkin, dean of American motorboat designers, says, “A good small boat is harder to design than a good large boat.” So I am happy to relate that an unusually good compromise has been doped out in Yo Ho! She has enough rocker to row reasonably well, yet not enough to kill her for planing work. She will putzz along with a 11/2 hp Elgin kicker at 7 miles; can use the Evinrude angle shaft 3 hp motor, and even take 71/2 hp Champions, Johnsons, Scott-Atwaters or Mercuries. A Yo Ho! was built—-see photos—-and the lessons learned are here incorporated for the final release as a perfected design. A boat for ideal cartop carrying should come within the limits set by the usual 52” car carrier spreaders, and should be reasonably flat in sheer to accommodate wide variation in car crowns. The Yo Ho! experimental model, preliminary to this design, was 12’ long by 48” beam, 16” depth. While her water performance fitted the outlined requirements, I felt that her rocker could be flattened a little without interfering with good rowing, that her dead rise could be increased to give a boatier feel, and that a pram type bow with a rounded block stem would take less bending. So our published and final version of Yo Ho! is one foot longer—l3 ft.; her beam is 50” over the sheer guard; and her depth has been increased io 18”. This accounts for the slight difference in modeling between the photo version and the design here. Another difference incorporated was to put the steering wheel on center. This gimmick is useful with 5 hp and over. So is a little water speedometer, shown on the dash. She is simplicity itself to build.
There is no sny in any of her planks--no twisting bends, in landlubber language-—to baffle the neophyte constructor. Anybody who can run a saw, use a plane, and drive screws can do about as good a job as a professional boatbuilder

4 pages, 3 plate(s)

$6.95
How Prams are Built--With Plans for an 8 ft. Pram (Pub. No. 5843)

with Plans for "Jennie" an 8-ft. Pram

by Weston Farmer

LOA 8 FT., BEAM 42 IN.

You see prams everywhere. They are numerous as lily pads. Why? They’re duck soup to build, and they’re light, useful, and fun. Here is the dope on them, with plans for a good one. I’ve named her Jennie because she is plump, and plain-—a little wren in the boat family. The pram may seem a new type, but actually they are old, being English in derivation. Until plywood got itself waterproof and gave everybody a cheap hull covering, the only prams you would see were rather heavy. So they were used chiefly abroad, mainly as mooring tenders to pint-sized British singlehanded sailing achts. The first pram design published in this country was the Wee Pup designed, if I recall correctly, by Edson B. Schock, a friend of mine and naval architect, iather of our Edson I. Schock. Her plans appeared at least 40 years ago. I built one taking 80 hours, because those were peaceful days; and Wee Pup was cross-planked, clinker tppsided—-all the befoodilements of old-time boatbuilding, for which there is now little patience.

12 pages, 3 plate(s)

$7.95
Binky--An All-Around Tender (Pub. No. 5845)

by Weston Farmer

Added plesure in gunning or fishing on your next cruise can be yours with this specially designed little craft. She's an excellent beginner's project.

LOA 12 FT. 6 IN., BEAM 461/4 IN., DRAFT 6 IN.

Any naval architect will tell you that a good small boat is much harder to design than a good big boat. The reason is obvious. To be good, a small boat has to meet a greater variety of compromises. She will be used more ways for more reasons than will a larger vessel. This fact has just been brought home to me. An 80-foot steel tug designed for a Canadian pulpwood outfit took less preliminary sketching time than Binky here. This will give you a clue to how much trouble it is to work out something good in the small boat line. Now a dinghy is toughest of all small boats to design. She must be dry in a sea; she must be good under oars. She must be light to tote well. So that, if her parent ship is large enough, she can be hauled aboard and snugged down. Rowing boats do not as a rule tow well. A dinghy must do all these things, and be boss of the situation if a kicker is used. Gunning and fishing and gunk-holing add much to the pleasure of using a larger boat. And the dink, like a good wife, makes a team of your whole outfit. I think this Binky design answers the correct set of prayers. Outwardly she looks like a million other skiff models. Skiff plans appear like dust in the Milky Way. Flat skiffs won’t tow well if they row well. If built of plywood they are rubbery unless lap-seamed. This boat is flat enough to tow well, enough rocker to row well and is helped by the cutaway skeg. There is a little dead rise, which is magic but critical stuff. It works wonders for boat feel only if you know how to use it.

8 pages, 2 plate(s)

$7.95
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