How to Build Boats


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  • Pub No.: 4906
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Widd Hauber/A very fine basic book on boat building with many useful illustrations.

by Wid Hauber

I am writing this especially for those who have little or no experience with boat building. I have taken the attitude that the reader is an amateur, therefore I ask those who read this that are familiar with boat terms and building methods to bear with me. I will endeavor to explain every step in such a way as to save the builder those costly and very discouraging mistakes that the amateur is most likely to make. I find that these mistakes are due mostly to the builder not knowing boat building methods and terms, rather than his lack of skill as a wood worker and mechanic. Contrary to popular belief, boat building does not require as much wood working skill as it does the knowledge of what to do and how to do it. I have seen some rank amateurs who hardly knew one end of the boat from the other, but who were willing to learn and could take and follow advice, turn out a sweet little craft that the average person would swear was built by a professional. The greatest mistake that the amateur usually makes is the failure to realize the relation of one part of the boat to the other. In other words, the boat itself will only be as strong as its weakest part. Consider building the keel of a boat, for instance from timbers 12 inches square, and then fastening them together with ten-penny spikes. That would be like a blacksmith fastening together two links of heavy chain with a piece of wire. It is very obvious that the first requirement of a boat is strength, then comes seaworthiness and performance, pleasing lines, resistance to rot and deterioration, etc. The builder must consistenty bear all these features in mind in order to build a boat that will give the utmost in satisfaction and pleasure. One can derive a great deal of pleasure and satisfaction in watching the boat progress—-and the work on a boat never becomes monotonous because of the ever changing form, and the finished job gives that satisfaction of achievement that one can be proud of. I’ve heard many boat enthusiasts and yachtsmen say that they got almost as much fun out of building their own boat as they get out of using it.

90 pages


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